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territories. >> president obama echoes the message of calm for the american people and support for japan. but did he wait too long? >> president obama's under fire for sticking to his schedule. is he showing admirable discipline, or is it looking like a failure of leadership? >> especially with the espn picks. >> contribute to help the people who have been devastated in japan. >> i was impressed with his picks and his knowledge of players, but that wasn't what the american people needed to see yesterday. >> yesterday president obama called japan's prime minister to discuss the crisis. >> we've got a president who on top of this knows he's got to turn this economy around. >> in some ways the president just can't -- you can't win sometimes. >> the japanese government's credibility continues to sink by the day. >> two very different pieces of advice between the u.s. government and the japanese government -- >> american leaders may be saying what japanese citizens are not hearing. >> there's a tradition in japan of sort of toning down bad news. >> who's in charge of this response effort? is
't forget there are enormous numbers of earthquakes in japan. people are not completely terrified every time there is an earthquake. it happens a lot. it's just that this earthquake was one of the most powerful ones ever recorded. one of the interesting things when you get back to the nuclear power plants, thomas, is the nuclear power plants were designed to with stand earthquakes that were five times less powerful than the one that hit them. they weren't designed to sustain a tsunami at the same time. you have to ask was the planning correct here? that's easier in hindsight, but was it correct in terms of safety measures. >> bob, thank you very much. appreciate it. >>> the situation with japan's nuclear reactor brings to mind for a lot of people the 1986 chernobyl disaster in russia and 1979's three mile island disaster in pennsylvania. joining me on the phone is dick thornburg who was governor of pennsylvania during the three mile island crisis. what has been going through your head as you watch the events unfolding in japan and the talk and fear about the nuclear reactors there? >> there
and friends. >> as you mentioned, people in japan used to these earthquakes. i want to take this opportunity they have joined us along with our global audience as we take you through this breaking news. 7.9 earthquake in japan, we know at this point a tsunami warning has been issued covering japan and right across the region. very widespread warnings covering that area. we are keeping an eye on that. what that means at this point is that the tsunami could be heading in the next couple of hours. we are keeping a close eye on this. this is why we are staying close on this story. want to go back to her, telling us the situation. she is in the middle of this. if you can repeat for our audience were you were when this earthquake struck. >> reporter: i was in tokyo station underground the platform. tokyo station, if your reporter with this at all, it is a very large extensive train station. one of the busiest in tokyo, a city that has many busy stations, this is the busiest. we are here shooting a different story. we felt a very strong tremor caracol of the signs started to shake back and forth. t
crowley in washington. stay tuned to cnn for much more coverage of the disaster in japan. up next, "fareed zakaria gps." >> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world? i'm fareed zakaria. i'll give you my take on the tragic devastation in japan. but first, here is the latest. the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami. japan's prime minister says his country is grappling with its worst crisis since world war ii. it's a race against time for rescue workers. the official death toll now stands at more than 1,200. but it will rise. one regional official says the deaths in his area alone were undoubtedly in the tens of thousands. 200,000 people living near a nuclear power plant in fukushima have been evacuated. there was explosion in a reactor yet and there are fears that there he will will be another explosion at a different reactor at the same plant. the world is trying to help out. the u.s.s. ronald reagan arrived off the coast on sunday and made dozens of trips delivering aid. meanwhile, more video is emerging of the sheer scale
. >>shepard: thank you very much. good morning from tokyo. it's 4:00 a.m. in the capital city in japan, 3 p.m. in new york city and the japanese people will awake as the sunrises in an hour and 45 minutes to learn that power outages will be rolling across this nation as they work to conserve fuel as 30 percent of all energy across japan comes from nuclear power and now there are great concerns of nuclear meltdown on the northeast coast a couple of hundred kilometers from where we are now. behind me is the rainbow bridge a fixture in tokyo. it is usually lit up in many colors and it is shut down as are the tops of skyscrapers as they work for voluntary energy conservation in the hopes that extra tokyo will not have to face the kind of black outs that could be necessary across this nation. high alert cross japan with nuclear concerns, thousands of people washing ashore, and many thousands still missing, and a disaster which the prime minister says here tokyo and the rest of the japan have not seen since world war ii. it began with an epic earthquake the most powerful earthquakes on record, th
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
. "morning joe" starts right now. >> this is an international tragedy and although japan is a highly advanced economy and technologically equipped to rebuild, at this moment of crisis, it's important all of us join together in providing any help and assistance that we can in the days and months to come. >>> good morning. it is tuesday, march 15th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in washington, msnbc political analyst, pat buchanan. also the washington correspondent for bbc world news america, catty kay, and former white house chief of staff of president george w. bush, andy card in the studio with us this morning. >> we will show some of the headlines just to show -- >> big ones. >> what a big story this is. catty, you lived in japan over three years. give us your insight on some images we are seeing. >> i was there for the kobe earthquake that was in 1995. we are all focused on the nuclear crisis. all of those families who have lost somebody, lost parents, you're hearing the japanese talking in muted ways about their loss. but for japanese, who find expressing emotion in public
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
noticeable, has yet to be seen. >> japan's east coast, hit with a 23-foot tsunami, shortly after the quake struck. police along the country's northeast coast, report finding the bodies of two to three hundred people, japan railways working to find a missing passenger train. while the government reports the giant wave swept away a ship, carrying about 100 people. >> unfortunately we expect to get more reports like those, 8.9 magnitude quake is japan's worst on record as we say, one of the worst in world history. and rocked cities hundreds of miles from epicenter an spawned dozens and dozens, as we hear it of aftershocks. >> look at one of japan's three nuke we're power plants, that are having some problems right now, the worst in the city of onahana where police ordered evacuations where a fire disabled a cooling system there. no reports of radiation leaking, secretary of state hillary clinton says the u.s. is sending coolant. >> there are fires as well, though, burning across the region with several major explosions, and japanese oil an chemical plants, you are looking at one over the oil
's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i have two question. on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement but i'd like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year. now, tsunami hit coast of japan and waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i just want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and secondly, you also touched on assistance from the united states to japan. and japanese government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance
we are approaching 9:00 a.m. across japan and we're expecting official word from the japanese leadership. and brand new account from north and east of the country. we'll be back at 7:00 eastern time, 6:00 central for the fox report. right now it's "special report" with my man bret baier with politics, fair and balanced. >> bret: a massive earthquake strikes japan. how is the u.s. responding? now there are concerns about nuclear power plants there. president obama says the noose is tightening around muammar gaddafi but events may suggest otherwise. saudi day of rage, did it materialize? live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. the u.s. and the rest of the world are mobilizing tonight to assist japan, following a massive earthquake and tsunami early this morning. the magnitude 8.9 offshore quake unleashed a 23-foot tsunami. hundreds are believed dead and that number could rise. japan says the power inside the nuclear plant is 1,000 times than the normal level. they lost control over pressure in reactors. waves hit hawaii and the
>>> disaster in japan. right now on "news nation" -- hundreds dead, hundreds more missing from the tsunami of mud and debris triggered by one of the strongest earthquakes in reported history. [ siren ] >> sirens of warning blaring in hawaii up and down west coast, communities evacuated for possibly hitting u.s. shores. >>> parts of california feeling the effect. boats on the coast are tossed around like toy. >>> hi, everybody, good to have you with me today. i'm thomas roberts. "news nation" following devastation from japan's 8.9 magnitude earthquake. right now, it's 4:00 in the morn in japan and people are trying to flee the hardest hit areas. the quake struck 80 miles off the northeast coast and felt all wait to beijing, china. as you can see, it sent people running into the streets in a frenzy, dodging debris falling from buildings. 4 million buildings without power in tokyo. but the quake wasn't the worst part. shortly after a violent tunisia crashed into the northeast coast, killing hundreds of people. waves washing away cars, roads, homes. aftershocks lasting for hours, c
in libya. also breaking news on the deteriorating situation in japan. so welcome, once again, to "american morning." it's been a week now since all of this happened. the tsunami, the earthquake, the number of dead in japan continuing to rise as hopes fade of finding any more survivors amid the rubble. in the meantime, the radiation concerns are spreading, as well. crews are now desperately trying to cool down fuel at one nuclear reactor. the number of dead has climbed to 6,500 people. and the search grows more frantic with 10,000 people still missing. >>> turning to fast-moving developments in libya, stopping gadhafi. britain, france, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be ta
, because obviously, we are concerned about what is happening in japan. >> thank you, i'm with a japanese newspaper. i have two questions on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement, but i would like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year, and you went there, and now the tsunami off of the coast of japan and the waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. secondly, you also touched on possible assistance from the united states to japan, and japanese government publicly said that japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you waiting to provide those assistance? >> the answer to the second question is yes. i told prime minister kan that we will provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is that the main assistance that we will provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions
not clear why. >> the smoke rose from the reactor 3. workers temporarily evacuated the facility. japan's nuclear authority said it did not know what was burning,ut there w no explosion. the government tried to reassure the public. >> radioactivity near the reactor has not increased, despite the smoke. we should not forget that even non-hazardous material can catch fire. we must stay calm. >> the operators of the facility are facing more complications. news has emerged of negligence of the plant. a routine inspection was missed just before the quake. components of the cooling system were not checked. oldis and refiters continued to douse the reactors with water on monday to keep them from overheating. the power has been connected to the control center for reactor two. that means the cooling pumps may be restarted. in tokyo, people fear of contaminated food and reactivity 27 times higher than normal has been detected in milk and spinach. the government stopped shipments of food from there. the consumer and vice hot lines are busy. >> i understand your concern. please watch the vegetles t
: are parts made for american cars made in japan? >> a lot of parts. this is how it's going to affect almost everybody. you're getting a lot of parts no matter what. it may be electronic chips, may be transmissions. i don't think anyone has a handle on the situation, how bad it might get. it looks like it will affect toyota more than anyone else. all their plants in japan have been down, some getting back up. honda will be affected. definitely going to be pressure at the dealership level to keep the prices up, especially on models that are in high demand. so i don't expect there will be a lot of bargains for consumers this spring. probably going to be summer before the situation rectifies itself. if you're looking for something like a prius or honda fit that the supply is going to be limited, wait a couple of months. it will probably get better. >>> hello, everyone. i'm don lemon. welcome to the second hour of the cnn "newsroom" here at cnn headquarters in atlanta. a lot of news to get you caught up on in libya. but first look at amazing new video captured on march 11th on the tsunami in jap
an earthquake and tsunami slammed japan and we're still getting new video from the day of the disaster. a man if you check this out was driving along the coastal highway last friday when the tsunami jumped the sea wall, swamped his car. his car floated in to a parking lot, but he managed z to get to safety. >>> japan's nuclear agency today raised the fukushima disaster to crisis level five on a one to seven scale. this puts it on par with the three mile island nuclear accident back in 1979. but it is still below the chernobyl disaster which topped the scale at level seven. >>> crews are using helicopters, fire trucks to pour tons of water on the nuclear plant for a second day now. while they try to cool the plant, electricians are trying to hook up a new mile long power line to bring the cooling systems for two reek reactors back on line. >>> people who fled the coast are beginning to trickle back. you can imagine when they see what is left of their homes. >> translator: i have no words to express my feelings. i lost my mind. we will have to start from zero. >> here is a look at what's ahead
are watching "world one." >>> coming up, one week after japan was hit by an earthquake and then a tsunami, efforts to stop nuclear reactors from overheating are going ahead nonstop. >>> a moment of silence in the tsunami zone, over 6,000 people are now known to have died, and over 10,000 are still missing. >>> and for the people who have survived, life still tough. not only homeless, many of them are also short of basic necessities. >>> we begin in libya where rebels desperate for help have been given help after an historic vote at the u.n. the future of libya remains uncertain, but the international community has spoken and the message could be a game-changer for moammar gadhafi. richard roth has details on the diplomatic action from new york. >> reporter: it was a dramatic cliff hanger, susan rice had to work the phones to win enough support for passage of a resolution authorizing a no-fly zone over libya backed by military force. >> this resolution should send a strong message to colonel gadhafi and his regime that the violence must stop, the killing must stop, and the people of libya
allies meet on whether to take military action. it could happen as soon as today. >>> in japan, more fallout from the growing disaster. now there's a new threat to those who live near the nuclear reactors. we will have a live report. good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. dramatic twists on the ground in libya and the threat of international military action. it is rapidliesque lating. this morning, shelling has been reported at the rebel stronghold of benghazi despite a cease fire gadhafi ordered on friday. renls say they shot down a pro-gadhafi fighter jet. in paris, a crisis meeting will begin shortly to detail what kind of military action the international community may take. action could begin within hours of this meeting. we have a live report from the region. >>> we have big news from japan this morning. workers are making progress as they frant ickically attempt to rebuild power lines to the reactors and hope to re-establish power at the fukushima daiichi sometime today but even if power is restored it is not clear if the cooling pumps will work. meanwhile, the japanese govern
part in a protest. >>> confusion today in japan about the damaged nuclear power plant. more pools of radioactive water were found inside and the owners gave widely conflicting accounts about the danger. that only heightened concerns that the crisis has been mishandled. lee cowan is in tokyo. >> reporter: it was the second apology in as many days. and just the most recent example of late or flat-out erroneous information coming from the owners of japan's stricken nuclear power plant. >> tokyo electric power company says it needs to revise its announcement. >> reporter: tepco officials reported radiation levels near a pool of one of the reactors were 10 million times the normal level. workers were evacuated and news reports were full of fears the crisis only deepened. for all the alarm bells the news set off, sets out tepco says it was wrong. the radiation level in that pool and three other pools was high, but not the astronomical level first described. tepco apologized for what it called an inconvenience. but it was an inconvenience no one here needed. those in the hardest-hit area
ahead. >>> also the disaster in japan. the nuclear radiation contaminates food and another powerful aftershock rocks the area near that troubled power plant. >>> and comparisons to chernobyl. how does the japan nuclear crisis compare with the world's worst nuclear accident? we'll take you to chernobyl, some 25 years after that catastrophe. >>> good morning. welcome to "msnbc saturday." i'm alex witt. just past 9:00 on the east. 6:00 a.m. out west. what's happening for you. dramatic twists on the ground in libya are putting more fresher on international leaders to launch a military response. gadhafi's army rolled into the rebel stronghold of agabenghazi battling rebels in the street. >>> and secretary of state clinton meeting with officials about taking military action in libya. and jim maceda is with us from tripoli. get to benghazi. first up, called the rebel capital. what do we know about the situation there this morning? >> reporter: hi again, alex. the situation is not looking good at all for those rebels in their capitol and for the civilians. the people who live 670,000 of the
away in tokyo a meeting of japan's prime minister at parliament turned to utter chaos. >> they're showing a city now on japanese television that looks like it's almost completely on fire. >> sparked fires in homes across the country and an oil refinery, a nuclear power plant shut down but no radiation escaped. closed airports. japan's famous bullet train shut down stranding hundreds of commuters. and then, a 23-foot wall of water crashed ashore. the tsunami sweeping away everything in its path. small boats smashed to bits. cars upturned and bobbing in the water. ships smashing against each other in part and a report of a ship with 100 people swept away. here's the latest on the devastation now. police in japan say 200 to 300 bodies have been found in sendai, the city closest to the epicenter. japanese tv reports as many as 4 million buildings in tokyo and their surrounding suburbs without power. scientists now say this quake is the fifth largest in the world since 1900. and it's the largest ever recorded in japan. a little more than an hour ago the first waves hit the u.s. main
of a long war in libya as moammar gadhafi digs in. >>> the nikkei rebounds as japan's nuclear angst eases a little bit and tokyo electric is ordered to pay compensation tore radiation leaks. >>> and his satirical take on world leaders and sports figure s. >>> this just in to cnn, israel former president has been sentenced to seven years in prison for rape. he was convicted on two charges of rape and other charges. throughout the trial, he maintained his innocence and continued to accuse his victims of fabricating stories. in. >>> now to libya and the fourth day of coalition air strikes on the country. >> it appears to be moammar gadhafi's compound. >> through the night, pro-gadhafi sources filled the skies of tripoli with anti-coalition fire. no aircraft was shot down. the coalition fired 159 tomahawk cruise missiles, hitting libyan air defense sites from tripoli to benghazi. missile attacks and air strikes have commanded scud missile sites. activity in the sky may now have peaked. the coalition air forces have moved from an action phase to what they call a patrolling phase now. >>> that
. the american-led bombing of libya. and the nuclear crisis in japan. one major question about the assault on libya, what happened to the media's skepticism? u.s. war planes hitting targets in libya for a second day today and i have to say this at the outset. the media get excited by war, the journalistic insulin starts pumping as we talk about cruise missiles and put up the maps and have retired generals on and sometimes something is lost, reminds me of eight years ago when shock and awe was reigned down upon baghdad and the media failed to ask questions. i looked at my "new york times" this morning and looked at my "washington post" and didn't see any editorials about the no-fly position. to newspapers don't see the excepty cal questions. what are if they are american casualties? do you stop this operation with gadhafi still in power? these are the questions we need to be asking. to help us answer them. rome hartman, former executive producer of the cbs news. and jamie mcentear, founder of the line of departure blog and former correspondent for cnn. where are the skeptical questions? >>
. >>> overwhelmed. rescuers fight aftershocks as they dig for survivors, but the japan death toll is soaring. millions now are facing a fourth night without water, food or heat. and now a radiation alert, a second hydrogen explosion rocks the stricken nuclear plant. japanese official its screen evacuees for radiation, and the u.s. has had to move warships back. >>> meanwhile meltdown fears. a third reactor is losing its cooling capacity. officials say even under the best scenario, this isn't going to end any time soon. it's monday, march 14th, 2011. i'm chuck todd. savannah is on assignment. >>> also this morning, libya, gadhafi's troops tighten their grip renewing calls for a no-fly zone from some rebels. we'll talk to the pentagon's press secretary on the latest on that. >>> then there's politics. another short-term budget deal. 2012ers are target to act more like candidates and the sound bite now heard around the country. let's get to the rundown and we're going to start in japan and the latest on the tragedy there. the prime minister is calling it the country's worst crisis since world w
cannot confirm. >>> and we continue to follow the nuclear crisis in japan as the pressure rises inside the reactor at the fukushima plant. we want to welcome the viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm natalie allen and this is cnn "world report." coalition forces are taking action to try and stop libya's leader from attacking his people. officials say allied planes and missiles have taken out about 20 libyan air and missile defense targets since saturday. there you can see the skies lit up with anti-aircraft fire. they say civilians are paying a heavy price. libya reports 48 dead and more than 150 injured. cnn is not able to confirm those figures. u.s. says they will assess the damage done so far in libya. but gadhafi isn't known for giving in to international pressure. as expected he remains defiant. he says other nations have no right to intervene in libya internal affairs. he spoke on libya state tv as soon as there were the attacks. >> translator: all targets -- maritime targets will be exposed to real danger. lithuania and north africa. because of this aggression a
and this is world business today. as radiation fears spread in japan, residents are warned to stay away from the nuclear power plant while shares in tokyo electric power sink. >>> investors kept their cash close to home. now as the region reels from protests, where will the money go next? >>> and japan airlines emerges from bankruptcy administration. we'll tell you the price it's paid. >> for now let's take you straight over to the stock market action here in europe. and we're 62 minutes into the trading day. here's how it looks right now. we are seeing modest gains right across the board. between about .25% to .6%. the dax was hit initially by the chance angela merkel has suffered a defeat. move on to the currency markets because that's affecting the euro, as well. and here we are. we're looking at 1.4074, 1.5983, just a shade under 160 for the cable. a bit of a weakness. and the japanese yen at 80.66. pauline? >>> well, charles, the markets here in asia finished mostly lower this session. the shanghai composite was the only to post gains boosted by financial stocks. uranium producers and m
of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality. >> reporter: all of the uncertaint
disaster in the making in japan after a new blast rocks a new power plant there. also a deadly tour bus crash in new york and conflicting reports from the driver and passengers. this while we try to get to the bottom of what really happened. and rebel fighters hammered in libya as forces loyal to qaddhafi use warplanes to bomb stra taoepbl i can conditions. it's all now and live and "happening now" "happening now." we're go glad you are with us on this very busy monday morning. hi, everybody i'm jenna lee? i'm jon scott. "happening now" a new explosion at a japanese nuclear power plant raises fears of an all out meltdown. the fallout from that could reach across the pacific affectth west coast of the u.s. more powerful after shocks rocked japan today. a thousand bodies wash ashore on the devastated northeast coast of the country. raising the death toll officially now lis listed as tad 9.0 and the tsunami that hit just half wards. the details get worse by the day. >> reporter: absolutely. it's completely unbelievable. every day i go out it gets worse than the day before. i went down by t
aftershocks. japan's index, the nikkei nose dived. the stock average fell 10.6%, down as much as 14% off one point during the day as worries of more reactor explosions increased. tokyo electric power stock, the owner of these reactors fell nearly 25% today. a look at our markets today, as you see, red arrows across the board. the dow jones down by 215 points. it's only 11:00 a.m. it's a reaction to what we have seen overseas and many market analysts did expect this. i'm thomas roberts. great to have you with me. japanese officials did raise the death toll to more than 2,700 people today but thousands more are still missing and boys continue to wash ashore. 400,000 people are homeless battling cold and windy conditions. nbc's ian williams is innia ma ga ta with the latest on the rescue and aid operations. >> good morning from yamagata air base where u.s. smirlt officers are in discussion about aid for survivors of the disaster. this could become a forward operating base for a major u.s. marine operation. we witnessed a navy c-130 transport aircraft fly in earlier. a heavy lift aircraft capabl
, candy. good evening, everyone. tonight major breaking news in two important global dramas. japan uses helicopters and water cannons in a desperate effort to cool fuel. and tonight there's word a new power line has been brought to the fukushima daiichi complex, but as friday dawns in asia, no sign of a major breakthrough and growing worries of two of the six reactors still in distress. >>> and first a major but belated commitment to stop the brutal march of gadhafi in libya. they voted to authorize not only a no-fly zone over libya, but also all necessary measures including military force to stop the government and mercenaries from slaughtering civilians. i'm told the pentagon and nato partners have contingencies that include air strikes to punish military units, leaving gadhafi's push on his strongholds in the east. now that the u.n. authorized sfors, the strikes could be carried out within hours if the president and his partners around the world issue the orders. cnn's richard roth track ad dramatic vote at the the united nations tonight. richards? >> john, u.s. ambassador to the u.n
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> lehrer: a massive earthquake struck japan today, the largest in the nation's history. it triggered tsunami waves that killed at least 1,000 people. and the entire pacific, including the west coast of the u.s., was put on alert. good evening. i'm jim lehrer. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have video of the disaster, and talk to three people in tokyo for firsthand accounts of what they experienced and how the nation responded. >> lehrer: and we get an early assessment of how well japan was prepared for the dual hit of the earthquake and the tsunami. >> woodruff: then, we excerpt president obama's remarks about the federal budget stalemate and the uprising in libya at a white house news conference. >> we are tightening the noose on qaddafi, seymour and more isolated internationally both through sanctions as well as an arms embargo. >> lehrer: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
in libya, across the middle east and japan. wolf in washington. two. happening right now, breaking news. president barack obama warns libyan troops and moammar gadhafi to stop attacks against civilians or face military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands o
. and we will as well. >>> back to the story that -- the radiation from the fallout in that crisis in japan. the radiation has now reached southern california. but the u.s. officials are saying it's a billion times beneath the levels that would threaten anyone's health. japanese officials raised the fukushima accident level from four to five. that means they consider it on par with our own three mile island incident. frantic efforts continue to con taint situation at the daiichi plant. the u.s. military says japan requested an unmanned high altitude reconnaissance aircraft to fly over the troubled plant. that drone is equipped with infrared sensors that can take pictures and get a better understanding what's happening inside the reactor. >>> getting aid to northeastern japan has finally gotten easier. the port of sendai partially reopened. a ship brought in a large container of supplies for hundreds of thousands of people living in shelters. a small measure now of comfort exactly a week after the disaster struck. >>> a week ago today, people rushed out of buildings as a magnitude 9.0 earthq
. "first look" is up next. >>> desperate measures. the world watches and waits as japan tries to contain its nuclear crisis. survival instinct, incredible new video of heroic rescues during the craftic tsunami. and royal jewel, the see-through dress that caught a prince's eye sells for a whopping sum. good morning. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more on "first look" on msnbc. today, we begin with a race against the clock. japan is desperately trying to reconnect power to critical cooling systems at the fukushima power plant. this as smoke has once again been seen rising from the crippled nuclear facility. today high-capacity fire engines are blasting tons of water into the hot zone, an unexplained switch from yesterday's air attacks. >> reporter: tons of water, the difference between salvation and catastrophe at japan's stricken nuclear plant. >> the situation remains very serious. but there's been no significant worsening since yesterday. >> reporter: the cloud billowing from the fukushima daichi plant on wednesday was all but gone thursday, but the possibility of a meltdown is still
that at least one of the reactors at japan's fukushima power plant is leaking. officials have found plutonium around the plant, and highly radioactive water has been discovered for the first time outside the building. the tokyo electric power company, tepco, maintains it poses no health risk to humans. we have this report. >> plutonium habeen found in five spots around fukushima, but tepco insists the levels are not harmful. >> the level detective is extremely small and will not affect human health. -- the level detected. >> they were trying to stay on top of the situation. now, a government reesentative is says that there may have been a partial meltdown inside reactor number two, this after water rose to more than 100,000 times its normal level over the weekend. they now have to pump out the contaminated water before they continue to work on reestablishing the cooling system. engineers can only spend a few minutes at a time in the reactor buildings due to the radiation levels. >> when you are inside, you are coaminated by radiation. i was exposed over five days. the longer you spend inside,
from tide. >>> a busy three hours. following the latest developments out of japan and libya and that will continue. see you on monday. have a great weekend. >> "cnn newsroom" with carol costello starts right now. >> thank you. 9:00 a.m. on the east coast and 6:00 a.m. on the west and i'm carol costello sitting in for kyra phillips. >>> two huge stories echoing around the world. in japan new developments in the nuclear crisis and a new measure how dangerous the situation is. >>> in libya the world takes action against a dictator and the fear he could slaughter his own people. we are looking at the no-fly zone, the united states role in that and the military strikes that could begin at any time. >>> there are quickly developing events in the libyan civil war. libya's foreign minister has just announced an immediate cease-fire. the move comes after the u.n. security council approved a no-fly zone and that cleared the way for possible military action against moammar gadhafi's regime. a french official today said strikes will take place swiftly. the mood in the rebel held city of
accomplish nothing. and grappling with the new reality, japan looks for strength as the death toll climbs. >> we are following two developing stories this hour on "world report." hello, i'm fionnuala sweeney and i want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. in libya, dawn approaches this sunday morning with "operation odyssey dawn" well under way. french, u.s., and british coalition forces began hammering key libyan installations late on saturday to enforce a no-fly zone newly approved by the u.n. security council. responding to the fighter jets and cruise missiles, moammar gadhafi's defenses have been peppering libya's skies with anti-aircraft fire. here now the very latest. the pentagon saying that so far, more than 100 u.s. and british tomahawk cruise missiles have slammed into libyan targets aimed primarily at air defense systems. despite the ways of attacks libyan leader gadhafi remains defiant, condemning the coalition strikes and urging people around the world to aid in libya's defense. the british prime minister, david cameron, calls the allied effort ag
. >>> straining relations slightly. the u.s. government tells americans in japan to move back from their reactor four times further than what the japanese government is advising its own population. >>> meanwhile, in the middle east, on libyan tv just reported that gadhafi's punishing offensive has reached the outskirts of bengahzi. today the united nation votes on a no-fly zone and a broader range of options including possible air strikes. our guest this morning general wesley clark. >>> i'm chuck todd, savannah is on assignment. happy st. patrick's day. speaking out about his unwavering support of nuclear power. >>> president obama is under fire for sticking to his schedule and policies in the face of alarming world events. is he showinged amirable discipline or looking like a failure of leadership? let's get to the rundown and start in japan. we begin with the death toll from last week's earth earthquake and tsunami is now stands at 5,429. nearly 10,000 are missing. president obama last night spoke to the japanese prime minister to express his condolences and getten ean update on the nucle cr
you tomorrow night. >> greta: tonight, just in, new and more smoke at fukushima japan's nuclear safety agency announcing smoke is rising from a building housing reactor number 2. there was an explosion at reactor 2 this week. right now the agency does not know the cause of this smoke. americans are being told to get out. state department warning citizens it is time to evacuate japan. the american government cannot guarantee it is safe. many japanese say their government has abandoned them. they have received no information and no help. one japanese mayor whose town is 12 miles from the nuclear plant says they are leaving us here to die. the situation japan is getting increasingly dangerous. it is un . people are packing to evacuate. it is so unstable the state department has begun evacuating americans on chartered flights. that first with 100 onboard departed hours allege. that's the easy evacuation. what about the americans trapped in other parts of the country? parts where roads have been ruptured by the quake and a challenge to get to? 14 buses are headed to sendai. you know about s
makes military decisions on libya, and watches the crisis on japan while on a diplomat i can trip to south america. so of course, republicans attack him. >> besides jewel track diplomacy. >> some of my colleagues are upset that france may be in the lead. >> tea partiers and some democrats attacked the president, calling it a possible impeachable offense. >> only congress has the power to declare war. >> we haven't declared war. >> you know what, but we are in a war. >> i really don't believe we have an obligation to get involved. >> what if this ends and gadhafi is still in power. >> outcome is unknown, political objectives are really unclear. >> and the most bitter republican presidential campaign losers attack the president. >> less dithering, more decisiveness. >> never seen a worse case of decision making. >> and finding a republican that almost conjured up the courage to say he is running for president. >> i am announcing formation of an exploratory committee for running for the president of the united states. >>> it is day three of operation dawn. the mission to enforce a un
>> darya: 70 a.m. the new crises at the power play and japan continues. >> mark: the police are looking for the shooter's after five people are shot overnight. >> darya: the kron 4 morning news at 7:00 a.m. start to melt. >> life from the bay area new station this is the kron 4 morning news. >> mark: good morning tuesday march 15, 2011. >> louisa: right now scattered showers we saw on and push through now pushing off to the east. where'swe are seeing scatd showers but for the most part we are seeing a light rain, pitcher scattered showers to the north bay as well. current temperatures right now in to the '50s. as we move through the day today, by the time the store moves through we could get one- quarter of an inch-three- quarters of the bench. that's where we will pick up the most break today. by wednesday, thursday weaker systems will move through. friday breezes store meant, notice how widespread we all are also going to see heavier downpours. by the afternoon staying cooler into the upper 50s as '60s. south bay could work its way up and to the mid-60s today. here's your
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